ESD and submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection for obstructive lipomas

Post written by Georgios Mavrogenis, MD, from the Department of Gastroenterology, Mediterraneo Hospital, Athens, Greece. This video describes the resection of an obstructive duodenal lipoma by means of submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection (STER) and the resection of obstructive colonic lipoma by means of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) Big lipomas are always challenging to remove. The …

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Duration or etiology of gastroparesis and clinical response after gastric per-oral endoscopic pyloromyotomy

Post written by Parit Mekaroonkamol, MD, Vaishali Patel, MD, MHS, and Qiang Cai, MD, PhD, from the Veterans Affairs Pittsburgh HealthCare System, and the Division of Digestive Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Gastric per-oral endoscopic pyloromyotomy (GPOEM) is an emerging endoscopic procedure for treatment of gastroparesis. Although multiple studies have demonstrated …

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“Posterior-like” anterior per-oral endoscopic myotomy

Post written by Georgios Mavrogenis, MD, from the Department of Gastroenterology, Mediterraneo Hospital, Athens, Greece. Endoscopists are free to choose between anterior of posterior based on their preference. Recent data illustrate that posterior POEM is faster and less prone to mucosal injuries. Conversely, some studies have associated anterior POEM with less post-myotomy acid reflux. We …

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Why did the sham-treated EPISOD study subjects do so well?

Post written by Peter B. Cotton, MD, FRCS, FRCP, from the Digestive Disease Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. The EPISOD study showed that sphincterotomy was not helpful for patients with post-cholecystectomy pain and little or no evidence for biliary obstruction (“SOD type III”). The conclusion was surprising; especially to those …

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Endoscopic replacement technique for migrated LAMS during endoscopic pancreatic necrosectomy

Post written by Mitsuru Okuno, MD, PhD, from the Department of Gastroenterology, Gifu Municipal Hospital, Gifu, Japan. EUS-guided drainage of walled-off necrosis (WON) is the accepted efficient and safe standard of care. The LAMS has a large lumen (up to 10 mm) and dual flanges that tightly adhere the LAMS to the fistula within the …

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Safety of endoscopy in cancer patients with thrombocytopenia and neutropenia

          Post written by Hamzah Abu-Sbeih, MD, and Yinghong Wang, MD, PhD, from the Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety of endoscopic procedures in patients with underlying thrombocytopenia or neutropenia …

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Risk of bacterial exposure to the endoscopist’s face during endoscopy

Post written by Asif Khalid, MD, from the Veterans Affairs Pittsburgh HealthCare System, and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Gastroenterologists will don a gown and gloves prior to performing GI endoscopy almost as a reflex, but the use of a face shield is not considered standard practice. This is in spite …

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